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Overtime

Overtime

Check out our overtime map
What time does my working day start?
Why is that important?
When can I claim overtime?
Normal overtime
Recall to duty
Advance of Hours
Working from a night shift into the first rest day
Working on a rest day
Working on a public holiday
Reinstatement of a cancelled rest day or public holiday
Can I claim travelling time?
Do you have to take time off in lieu?
What are Inspectors entitled to? This is a useful document created by the Humberside IBB


What time does my working day start?

For those officers on an 8-hour pattern, the working day starts at 0600 and ends at 0600 the following day.

For those on a variable shift agreement (VSA), the working day starts at 0700 and ends at 0700 the following day.

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Why is that important?

Rest days start at the end of the working day and not at the end of a tour of duty. You therefore need to know when you can start to accrue overtime at a rate of time and a half.

Also, you need to know at what time your rest day ends and a working day starts for overtime purposes. See ‘Advance of Hours’ below.

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When can I claim overtime?

There are several ways in which to work overtime:

Normal overtime

You can claim overtime if you work on at the end of a tour of duty. However, if you’re told of the need to work overtime after the start of the shift, the first ½ hour on the first 4 occasions in any one week should be deducted. Overtime such as this is recorded at time and a third.

If you’re told no later than the start of the shift of the requirement to work overtime that day, ie pre-planned overtime, you do not need to deduct the first ½ hour.

Recall to duty

You can claim overtime as a result of a recall to duty. A recall is best described as an island of duty between 2 tours of duty. It is not a recall if your rostered tour of duty has been brought forward (see Advance of Hours below). Therefore, if you work 0700 to 1600 for instance, go home and are then required to return to work at 2100 before returning home at 2300, that is a recall to duty and you can claim the hours you work at time and a third. You can claim travelling time from your home to place of work for a recall to duty as long as the period of duty together with the travelling time does not exceed 6 hours.

If you’re recalled to duty but that period of duty then rolls into your normal tour of duty, it is not a recall but would constitute your tour of duty for that day, plus any normal overtime worked (subject to the Advance of Hours below).

Advance of Hours

An advance of hours occurs when your tour of duty has been brought forward onto a day on which you’ve already completed a tour of duty.

Therefore, if you were required to report for duty at 0500 having worked 0700 to 1600 the previous day, that would be an advance of hours.

You can claim overtime for an advance of hours only if you’ve not been given appropriate notice, defined in Police Regulations as 8 hours prior to the start of the new tour of duty.

In the above scenario, if you were told of the requirement to report for duty at 0500 prior to 2100 the night before, you cannot claim any overtime and your tour of duty starts as normal at 0500.

If you are told of the requirement to report for duty at 0500 after 2100, you’re entitled to claim overtime at time and a third for the hours between 0500 and the start of your rostered tour of duty on that day. However, unlike normal overtime, your tour of duty also actually starts at 0500 and, after completing your normal tour of duty, you can then claim overtime again at time and a third.

Example: On Monday you work 0700 to 1600 and go home. Your tour of duty for the Tuesday is 1000 to 1900. At 2130 on Monday night, you’re told to report for duty at 0500 on Tuesday morning. You should then claim from 0500 to 1000 as overtime at time and a third. You work your normal 9 hour tour of duty from 0500 which gives an end of duty time of 1400. If you work later than 1400, you again claim overtime at time and a third from 1400 to the end of your duty.

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Working from a night shift into the first rest day

The rest day starts at the end of the working day and not at the end of your tour of duty. Therefore, those on an 8 hour pattern will start their rest day at 0600 and those on a VSA will start their rest day at 0700.

There are then 2 different scenarios depending on which shift pattern you work.

For those working an 8 hour pattern or the new 2x2x2 pattern:

If you work into your first rest day directly from a tour of duty, you should claim the time worked up to the first hour of that rest day at time and a half, in increments of completed 15 minutes. After the first hour, you should then claim a minimum of 4 hours at time and a half.

For those working 10 and 12 hour shifts, you should claim the time worked up to the second hour of that rest day at time and a half, in increments of completed 15 minutes. After the second hour, you should then claim a minimum of 4 hours at time and a half.

Working on a rest day/cancellation of a rest day

If you are required to work on a rest day, you are entitled to overtime at the appropriate rate. The appropriate rate is as follows:

Where less than 15 clear days’ notice are given of the requirement to work – time and a half;

If you work less than 4 hours on a rest day, you are entitled to claim a minimum of 4 hours plus reasonable travelling time from your home to place of work. Reasonable travelling time has been deemed to be ½ hour each way.

If you have more than 15 clear days’ notice, the rest day should be cancelled and then re-rostered within 4 days of the cancellation being notified to the officer.

The exception to this would be ‘special duty’ where time and a half is paid even though more than 15 clear days’ notice have been given.

Working on a Public Holiday

If you’re required to work on a public holiday, you can claim whatever hours you’ve worked (or a minimum of 4 hours) at double time. Shift workers should be rostered for their normal tours of duty on public holidays so, if you’re a 10-hour worker, you should be rostered for a 10-hour shift on a public holiday. If you are told to work a public holiday with less than 8 days' notice, you can claim double time for the hours worked (or a minimum of 4 hours) and another day off.

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Reinstatement of a cancelled rest day or public holiday

If you’re told of a requirement to work on a rest day or public holiday but are then informed that the requirement for the cancellation has ceased to exist, the following applies:

If you’ve been given more than 8 clear days' notice of the reinstatement of the rest day or public holiday, you should take the rest day as normal.

If you’ve been given less than 8 clear days’ notice of the reinstatement of a rest day or public holiday, you can either take the day off as normal or work the day at the appropriate rate. The appropriate rate for a rest day is the rate at which the day was cancelled. Therefore, if you’re told with 3 months notice that you will have to work a football match but then, 6 days prior to the event, the day is reinstated, you would be able to work it at flat rate with another rest day being re-scheduled. If you were cancelled for the day with only 12 clear days’ notice and it was reinstated with less than 8 days’ notice, you would be able to work the day at time and a half.

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Can I claim travelling time?

If you’re recalled to duty or work on a rest day without appropriate notice (i.e. if you’re being paid overtime for the duty), you can claim travelling time as long as the period of duty together with the travelling time does not exceed 6 hours. If it does, you cannot claim travelling time.

You are not entitled to claim travelling time when working into your first rest day directly from a tour of duty.

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Do you have to take time off in lieu?

No. The choice of whether you take payment for overtime worked or time off in lieu is your decision. If you choose to take time off in lieu, i.e. you put the time on your card, the time should be taken within a 3 month period following the week in which that day is worked or paid at the appropriate rate.